The Millennial’s Guide to Kitchen Remodeling

Millennials, also known as Generation Yer’s, comprise much of the white-collar workforce. Born in or after the 1980’s, they are the largest generation since the Baby Boomers and the largest group of new homeowners.They’re also the most well educated, the most tech savvy, the most open minded, and the most in debt.

What Millennial Homeowners Like and Why

As a result of these tendencies, millennials have dramatically different home design taste than their
parents. They prefer the latest kitchen applications to a second oven. They prefer open space to packed counters and pantries. And, despite their remarkable buying power, millennials tend to buy on a budget or pursue do-it-yourself projects.

Many of them have high-powered, six-figure-earning jobs, but need to spend wisely in order to continue
paying off student loans. Perhaps because they lived through the real estate bubble, they understand the value of resale. They are likely to invest in their properties, which tend to be their first major purchase, and make improvements to increase their properties’ value. They’re also twice as likely as Baby Boomers to decorate and remodel the interior of their homes, including their kitchens. Here’s a quick guide that outlines what millennials like in their kitchen remodels and why.

Open Floor Plans

Many Gen Yer’s buy fixer-upper homes, former industrial spaces, and spacious, wide-open apartments. First time millennial home buyers might take their time locating a home with open floor plans.Stylistically, they like minimalist, modern home designs and their kitchens are no exception. For example, they may favor a bar table with bistro chairs over a kitchen island. They may ditch the idea of a dining room altogether and use that space as a living room extension. Either way, the less clutter, the better.

Streamlined Designs

Because millennials prefer elegant, sleek spaces, they tend to favor hardwood, granite, and marble for
kitchen floor choices. Instead of patterned wall paper, they often like bold, solid colors such as bright
yellow, midnight blue, or fire-engine red. These might be the first changes a new homeowner makes to his or her kitchen because they are the least expensive.

High-End Appliances

Even Gen Yer’s who are strapped for cash still have their priorities set on authentic experiences, which
includes cooking at home. They are likely to spend money on an ultra-sharp knife set, a high-quality blender, an espresso machine, and a state-of-the-art food processor.

Kitchen desks, charging stations, and flat-screen televisions are also go-to appliances for tech-savvy
millennials. Many young professionals use the kitchen as an at-home office, meaning it needs to have multipurpose functionality.

Wall Storage

Many of the 35-and-under crowd reside in urban environments, especially small homes and apartments. When you like a streamlined kitchen but don’t have much space, you need to get creative about storage.

To increase counter space and decrease miscellaneous appliances cluttering up that counter space, wall mounted shelves provide extra storage options. Built-in cubbies let apartment dwellers stash non-perishables without taking up precious pantry space.

Energy-Efficient and Green Products

More than any other previous generation, millennials are passionate about saving energy. Therefore, they are inclined to buy energy-efficient products such as low-emissivity windows and light-emitting diode bulbs. These “green” products maximize passive solar heating. They simultaneously emit light from outside and trap heat inside.

This less-is-more approach to kitchen design is easy to achieve with the right guidance. If you are a
millennial homeowner, you value quality. You want quality products in your new kitchen. You want a beautiful but functional space.

Instead of trying to tackle your kitchen remodel on your own, invest in your property and contact an
experienced St. Louis kitchen remodeling contractor with unmatched design knowledge and craftsmanship.

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