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We’re Just Floored By This Tile

Here in the Midwest, our homes are often furnished with traditional finishes. Warm hardwood, timeless tile, red brick, and other classic touches. At Callier & Thompson, we are always on board for a timeless and traditional look, but we’re also constantly looking for new, more modern and functional takes on the usual finishes. In recent years, tile manufacturers have focused on creating porcelain tile that takes on a whole new aesthetic. Porcelain that looks like rustic hardwood, textural porcelain that mimics concrete, or just different sizes, shapes and patterns that put a new spin on things have changed the flooring selection process. Read on for some of the options we’re liking these days . . .
American Olean_Porcelain Wood Tile

Above: The textural wood detailing found in American Olean’s Arbor House™ porcelain tile collection give you the rich, timeless look of hardwood, but the ease of maintenance of tile. Available in four different classic colors, this is a great choice for almost any kitchen or bathroom.

 

YinYang_Studio_Bathroom

Above: Tile isn’t just square or subway anymore. The Yin + Yang Collection from Crossville offers a variety of size and shape options, allowing you to create unique patterns like this black and white chevron. Playing with patterns is ideal for a master bath or powder room.

Rustic Porcelain Tile Flooring

Above: These rustic porcelain planks from Mediterranea’s Boardwalk Series were designed to mimic the weathered wooden boardwalks of famous seaside destinations like Venice Beach, Atlantic City and more. The flooring in the kitchen above is called Myrtle Beach.

 

Cement Style Tile

Above: The Urban Stone Collection from Mediterranea uses inkjet technology to create porcelain flooring that emulates wood and cement—creating graphic, loft-inspired modern flooring that would bring an air of edginess to any kitchen or bath.

 

Rustic Porcelain Tile_Boardwalk

Above: Also from Mediterranea’s Boardwalk Series, the Coney Island planks shown here mimic a vintage herringbone pattern—reminding us of a luxurious Parisian apartment. But because it’s porcelain, it’s low maintenance and durable.